Features

  

DENR, communities in MIMAROPA keep eye on forest protection amid COVID-19 Vigilance amid COVID-19. CENRO Sablayan in Occidental Mindoro hauled 880.28 board feet of Amugis, Lauan and Banuyo, premium species of trees which were believed to be illegally cut just as the country undergoes enhanced community quarantine to fight COVID-19.

Onto the third week of the enhanced community quarantine in Luzon, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources in MIMAROPA has apprehended in separate locations in the region, abandoned lumber which were believed to be illegally cut while the entire country was observing extreme measures to fight COVID-19.

On March 22, the Monitoring and Enforcement Section of the Community Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO) in Sablayan, Occidental Mindoro apprehended and hauled at Sitios Anduyanan and San Pablo in Brgy. Alipaoy, Paluan town a total of 880.28 board feet of Amugis, Lauan and Banuyo, premium species of trees that are used to build structures and make furniture.

“We have to retrieve the lumber immediately, otherwise, the perpetrators would get them back, or other people might take them for personal use,” Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Officer (PENRO) in Occidental Mindoro, Ernesto Tañada said.

As part of administrative proceedings, a notice was left in the area for any claimant to show proof of ownership of the apprehended lumber. The items were then transported to CENRO Sablayan Coordinating Office in Mamburao for documentation and seizure, and for said office to take custody of the lumber.

Similarly, DENR employees in Sibuyan, Romblon, apprehended from March 23 - 24, Apitong lumber with a total volume of 266 bd ft in Brgy. Espana in San Fernando town. Two days after, with the help of the Philippine National Police, the team also retrieved abandoned 120 bd ft of red Lauan in Brgy. Mabini.

“It is difficult at these times, but we maintain to be on call 24/7 to protect our forests,” Romblon PENR Officer Maximo Landrito expressed.

Meanwhile in Palawan, the Forest Product Monitoring Station of CENRO Taytay recovered 10 sacks of charcoal of mangrove species in Brgy. Aberawan, El Nido on March 16. The group also apprehended 10 sacks of charcoal of Forest Tree species abandoned at Sitio Talogon, Brgy. Bagong-bayan in Taytay on March 21.

“Our team likewise responded to a slash and burn (kaingin) cultivation in Sitio Sablayan, Brgy. Pancol, also in Taytay on March 23. The incident shall be under further investigation as we have already identified the owner of the lot, as well as those who initiated the activity,” Taytay CENR Officer Alan Valle reported.

In light of the imposition of ECQ, government workers in the executive branch were ordered to work from home and maintain skeleton force to respond to essential and urgent services. DENR MIMAROPA, in consonance with the pronouncements of Civil Service Commission and Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu, has arranged for alternative working arrangements to ensure continuous delivery of service and safety of personnel at the same time.

“While most of us are at home, that does not stop us from being on the look out on anyone violating nature,” DENR MIMAROPA Regional Executive Director Henry Adornado said. “We know that illegal loggers would take advantage of the situation so we strengthen our monitoring and enforcement teams through the LGUs and communities to prevent them (violators) from succeeding in their unlawful activities,” he added.

RED Adornado meanwhile thanked the communities for keeping a watchful eye on the environment. CENRO Sablayan received a tip on the abandoned lumber from a concerned citizen. CENRO Taytay on the other hand, was informed of the illegal activities through social media.

The director clarified that DENR MIMAROPA takes precautionary measures whenever it deploys quick response teams to ensure the health and safety of its personnel as well as the community they are responding to.

“Defending nature is a daunting task, especially during these times. That is why we laud our personnel in the field for doing their job in the midst of this ECQ. We are also grateful knowing that as we all grapple with this dreaded disease, the public remains our constant partner in protecting our environment and natural resources,” he concluded. (With reports and photos from CENRO Sablayan, CENRO Taytay and PENRO Romblon) ###

Officials and employees of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), including visitors nowhavethe chance to familiarize themselves with the agency’s priority legislative agenda through an exhibit set up at the DENR Central Office main lobby.

The week-long exhibit, which runs from June 10 to 14,coincides with the 32nd anniversary celebration of the DENR, as well as the 121st Philippine Independence Day.

It showcasesproposals that have been pending in the legislative mill for years but are up for re-filing in the upcoming 18th Congress.

These include: the Land Use Bill (House Bill or HB 5240); amendment in the Mining Law (HB 6259); E-waste Management Bill (HB 2964); and the Delineation of Forest Limits Bill (HB 143).

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The exhibit was put up by the DENR Legislative Liaison Office (DLLO), which is headed by Assistant Secretary Joan Lagunda as the agency’s appointed Legislative Liaison Officer.

Lagunda in her message assured the DENR of the DLLO’s steadfast commitment in advancing the interest of the environment.

“Under the present leadership, the environment-loving community can be assured that the LLO is striving to be heard by our revered lawmakers to craft legislations that will empower the Department more in performing its mandate,” she stated.

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The exhibit also features a video presentation on the background of the DLLO, as well as the officials who have managed the office. Among these officials are Undersecretaries Ernesto Adobo, Juan Miguel Cuna, and AnalizaRebuelta-Teh; Assistant Secretary Joselin Marcus Fragada; and Director NiloTamoria.

The DLLO is the office tasked to liaise with both houses of Congress regarding all matters impinging on relations between the DENR and the legislative branch.

It is also the official representative of the DENR in the Legislative Liaison System of the Office of the President, with Secretary AdelinoSitoy, head of the Presidential Legislative Liaison Office, as the Chief Legislative Liaison Officer.

Parties interested in pending environmental legislative proposals may contact the DLLO via telephone number 920-1761, or through email address This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..###

 

The modern-day Battle for Manila Bay—now affixed with a hashtag—begun more than a decade ago. The order of the Supreme Court to 13 Mandamus agencies to rehabilitate Manila Bay in 2008 was the first official attempt to save the troubled waters.

The high court directed these agencies—with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) at the front line—to revive the bay to the level that is fit for swimming and other forms of contact recreation. But with the threats that kept on draining its remaining life, what hope is left for today’s Manila Bay?

The waters of the Manila Bay Area span beyond the seascape of Roxas Boulevard. Its 190-kilometer coastline passes across the inland areas of the National Capital Region, Central Luzon, and CALABARZON, mainly Cavite and Batangas.

 

 

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 Underwater life still seen vibrant in the Manila Bay Area (MBA) with these polyps of soft coral Xenia sp. —Photo by JIM Padin (2018)

Corals in sight

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Extended polyps of Turbinaria sp. along the reefs of Corregidor Island in Cavite —Photo by JIM Padin (2018)

The Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau (ERDB), the research arm of the DENR, is currently gathering data to assess the vulnerability of the bay to climate change impacts. The project is being implemented by a team of science practitioners of various disciplines seeking significant, research-driven information on the factors influencing the present state of the bay and its vulnerability to different hazards. The project components include terrestrial, coastal, freshwater, air and water quality, social, and solid waste management.

As part of the coastal component, Jose Isidro Michael T. Padin, Supervising Science Research Specialist at the ERDB, and his team did an inventory of coral communities in the provinces of Bataan and Cavite.

“Of the MBA’s total reef area of 293.68 hectares, nearly 72% of the estimated reef area is found in Cavite. The reef sites in Maragondon and few on Corregidor and Caballo Islands had fair to good live coral cover, but these reefs are continually threatened by sedimentation, nutrient contamination, reduced water clarity, and high fishing pressure,” Padin said.

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Bubble coral Plerogyra sinuosa (Dana, 1846) in Maragondon, Cavite –Photo by JIM Padin (2018)

Runoff of sediments and nutrients, for instance, had been documented to cause coral mortality by smothering and burial, low coral recruitment, reduced coral diversity, change in community structure, macro-algal abundance, reduced calcification, and reduced live coral cover in many reef ecosystems around the world. Padin explained that “the remaining reef areas in the bay are located proximate to the mouth of Manila Bay (areas of Corregidor, Bataan, Ternate, and Maragondon), where water circulation is relatively strong. Strong water current can reduce stress on corals by limiting sediment deposition at the bottom and on coral colonies. It can also facilitate transport of fresh supply of plankton and improve water clarity by flushing of land-based materials out of the bay.”

Corals filter organisms in the water as they feed on planktons. Corals also need light to support the photosynthetic activity of symbiotic algae living in their tissues.

Science and policy convergence

Padin and his team learned that in “Corregidor and Caballo Island in Cavite—based on the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA) coastal resource map—the reef area spans to 293.68 hectares. This does not include the reef in Mariveles, Bataan since the NAMRIA map has no record of corals there. However, when we checked two of the purported seagrass sites using SCUBA, we sighted corals instead.”

ERDB Director Sofio B. Quintana said the coverage of this research encompasses terrestrial and marine ecosystems. “In the ridge-to-reef research on the Manila Bay Area, we are seeking for a definite connection among risk factors. Right now, we are trying to explore more data on informal settler families, air and water quality, and habitat to make scientific studies relevant for future projects.”

According to Director Quintana, the Bureau is trying to come up with a unified framework for these projects. Consolidated properly, these could make an inference on the status of the Manila Bay Area.

Part of ERDB’s initiative is to influence policymaking bodies. “We want to provide reference in their decision process backed-up by research. If there are existing policies, maybe we could harmonize and align researches to these policies,” Quintana said.

Threats at bay

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This lettuce coral Pectinia sp. in Maragondon, Cavite makes an underwater architecture with its elongate valleys and thin walls. —Photo by JIM Padin (2018)

The Manila Bay Area works like a nature’s septic tank draining 17 major river systems in nearby cities and provinces. Wastes from households and industries from these estuaries pose the most apparent threat to the bay. The DENR data showed that only 15 percent, or an estimate of 2.4 million out of 16.3 million, of the water-served population of the National Capital Region are linked to a sewerage system.

Other than the unregulated sanitation and waste disposal, the Manila Bay Area is also vulnerable to the dangers of noise pollution, the presence of invasive species brought by international cargo ships, and illegal fishing activities.

“What we only see from above is the surface of another living world underneath us. People should understand that Manila Bay is home to other life forms despite its rapid deterioration. There remains hope in Manila Bay. It is not yet too late to revive the life out of its troubled waters,” said Quintana.

The Manila Bay has been a witness to Philippine’s historical narrative and to Filipinos’ rise and fall in our environmental battle within our waters. The Battle for Manila Bay is far from over—but hope is still in sight. —­Christele Jao Amoyan

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A pink anemonefish Amphiprion perideraion (Bleeker, 1855) finds refuge among the tentacles of sea anemone Heteractis sp. in Caballo Island, Cavite. —Photo by JIM Padin (2018)

Visiting the picturesque Candaba Wetlands might be the next adventure you need. That is, if we can continue to preserve and sustain it for the next years and generations to come... 
Feature Candaba Wetlands web

Landslides are becoming more prevalent in the country lately because of the onslaught of typhoons that are primarily caused by climate change. As a vital environmental issue, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) encourages the public to take precautions in their respective areas with the use of geohazard maps which serves to “identify various geological features and associated hazards and inform the local officials about the susceptibility of their communities.” 
Feature Geohazard Maps web2